An Almost Made Up Poem


Reaper Fever: Why I’m Obsessed with Mass Effect
May 12, 2012, 10:22 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized, Video Games | Tags: , ,

 

I use to really be into video games, being a Nintendo gal myself. I loved all things Zelda and Mario until I was about 21. ¬†I stopped playing video games once I started Grad school,¬†because¬†well, I would have never graduated otherwise. ¬†Once I moved to Oakland, got a full time job, and settled in my “adult life” (snooze). I started seeing how video games had¬†evolved. ¬†What started a¬†pixelated¬†plummer chasing after a pink princess turn into full-fledged¬†epic games with awing graphics. ¬†I know that games like Zelda and Final Fantasy had all those story elements in place, and they pioneered the RPG type play. However, I¬†completely¬†missed when video games began looking like movies while I was on hiatus from playing.

I began feeling I was missing  out on something, so I started playing once again. Diving deeper and deeper into obsession as I played Dragon Age and its less superior sequel, I found that my love of video games had been reignited. However, nothing would compare me for how epic Mass Effect was as a game and story.

As an avid reader and self-proclaimed snob (at times; part time really), I really didn’t understand how close a video game could come to duplicating that wonderful feeling of enthrallment I experience from reading a book, waiting for its characters to develop, watching the story change. That was until Mass Effect. I really loved Dragon Age with all its medieval geekery: mages, rogues,¬†warriors, fighting in the classical battle of good versus evil. However, Mass Effect was the first video game that drew me in like a well-written novel.

Mass Effect’s story is basic and rather simply¬†executed. You are in a¬†future¬†where¬†aliens¬†and humans coexist throughout the Milky Way; you’re Lieutenant Sheppard of the Normandy, who’s¬†mission¬†is to stop the Reapers ( inorganic life forms¬†that ruins all organic life it chooses to destroy). Save the earth: easy enough objective. The plot has been done a million times, but this time it is done in an video game that looks like a work of art and stars a cast of characters that are as inviting as any Oscar Wilde character. You follow this story throughout 3 games. This game does not go on and on like Zelda. There are no more princesses to save at the end of the 3rd game. Instead, there’s a ¬†definite conclusion (which is completely up to you).

You are completely part of this journey.It certainly sucked me in like a good novel. And like a good novel, short story, or novella, whenever you try to summarize it to someone it never sounds as good as when you let them read it for themselves. The simplistic and formulaic plot does not do justice to how you feel as a player.¬†I can tell you “The Metamorphosis” is about a guy who turns into a bug or “The Stranger” is about a guy who kills someone, but that wouldn’t tell you what those stories are really about. The same goes for¬†the Mass¬†Effect¬†trilogy; there are layers of political and social issues that¬†arise¬†as you play, adding to your experience and making you face tough moral and political issues that don’t just apply to this galactic¬†imaginary¬†world.

I loved the trilogy’s ending. I know there’s been a lot of hoopla about the ending of the Mass Effect trilogy, but honestly, after reading so many novels, I never expect happy endings nor do I need them. I crave the story. Mass Effect delivers a story that fulfills my intellectual needs while¬†letting me shoot things. How much more awesome can that get?! ¬†So, let me get back to saving the world and later, I’ll read some Murakami. Maybe I’ll get an idea for another RPG about a very intricate, complicated character and his adventures exploring his adult life.